Treasures of the future

Treasures of the future

Small town living…Have you ever lived in a small town where everyone knows everything about everyone? I love small towns and the sense of community as a whole, but the “code of silence” that envelops many (not all!) small towns is often a common characteristic uniting former and / or current residents of small towns. When something horrific happens, that code of silence often remains…. I’ll use the following hypothetical: a family who is extensively involved in local politics, perhaps the mayor and her or his family.

As mayor, she or he is the leader of a municipality, and speaks officially on behalf of the government and the community as a whole. No pressure there, huh? The duties and responsibilities of a mayor are spelled out in a set of regulations set forth by the charter she or he represents. However, that book of rules sometimes becomes fuzzy…. So many unpredictable situations arise in which one needs to be vigilant in her or his stance, because constituents will try to use the mayor’s position to benefit their own agendas. As community leader, it is the mayor’s responsibility to decide whether or not that third party’s agenda will benefit the community in its entirety, or, rather line someone’s pocket.

So, when faced with this conundrum, should the mayor in her or his position of privilege and authority use that third party’s agenda as a way to help the community? Think about that for a second. What would you do as a mayor for your community? There are countless ways that decision making process could go terribly wrong…. Again- no pressure there, huh?

After all, the most important roles of being a mayor are safeguarding the accountability and transparency of city operations, and locating any activities that will enhance the social, economic, and environmental welfare of the jurisdiction, including its residents. So, we vote for individuals who we feel will best meet the community’s advancement as a whole. The future of the community, i.e., a nation’s youth, is vital, as those are the individuals who will be the future community leaders. As such, it is vital for leaders, including those at the grassroots level, to safeguard those who represent the future.

In youth we learn; in age we understand. (Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach)

I think it’s important for us as a society to remember that the youth within juvenile justice systems are, most of the time, youths who simply haven’t had the right mentors and supporters around them – because of circumstances beyond their control. (Q’orianka Kilcher)

Education is not a tool for development – individual, community and the nation. It is the foundation for our future. It is empowerment to make choices and emboldens the youth to chase their dreams. (Nita Ambani)

The youth is the hope of our future. (Jose Rizal)

See you in the next post!

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Author: The Ordinary Compass

Hello and welcome to this collection of anecdotes from my years of ordinary moments and timeless memories. I try to share a positive message, as well as lessons learned which have helped me appreciate life. Sometimes, all it takes is a simple (positive) gesture. I write in the hope that I can make a difference and you as the reader will also see the possibilities that surround you, and as well that the little things do make a big difference. I’m originally from New Jersey, have traveled and lived on both the east and west coasts, and have happily been a Virginia resident for more than ten years. I have been married for over ten years; my wife is my anchor and has kept my compass correct. I have always been an individual who likes the outdoors. I like taking my time to think about the outcomes of situations. I enjoy philosophy and love science. I am no stranger to high adrenaline activities and love everything that revolves around water. Thank you for stopping by and feel free to comment, re-blog (with credit), or just read along! –Robert Konz. The Ordinary Compass: Original photographs and writings are the copyright and property of Robert Konz, and may not be used without permission.

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